India x Raymond part 2; Time to Teach

So, now I’ve been in India for 12 days. The internship, however, has really just started, in the sense that I’ve taught students for only the third day now.

 

Teaching kids is exhausting, and ever-challenging – which comes at no surprise – but I suppose it has become much more real for me in the past week. Today, Monday, starts my first full week of teaching summer school from 9-11:30 and 4-6 every day. Sure, it’s only five and a half hours a day, but when combined with designing and preparing lessons, debriefing, and reflecting on our teaching, I think it will definitely be exhausting.

 

Challenges so far:

  1. Today someone threw up in our class. We evacuated the classroom and let the kids play outside
  2. I don’t speak Hindi and they don’t speak English. This makes it hard for me to gauge if they have grasped the material I am trying to teach them, and respond to their questions.
  3. Weak wi-fi. Text is usually bearable, but there’s no guarantee with pictures. Forget about Skyping, and if you’re lucky the delay on your Facebook Messenger call will be less than 5 seconds.

 

Successes:

  1. Our class has already made flags representing their identity, little cut-outs of themselves, and a human body, complete with a liver, heart, stomach, windpipe, esophagus, kidneys, lungs, bladder, and intestines.
  2. Yesterday, we went to a Buddhist monastery and learned a lot about Buddhism and its role in India. I spun 132 prayer wheels.
  3. There’s nothing as tasty as shortbread cookies after a couple hours of teaching.

 

Other than teaching, Rachna, our host, has taken us out to a lot of different sites and a market. Much fun, and very cheap spices. I have yet to interact with Indians my age, but hopefully I can meet some soon.

 

Bye-bye for now, and back to lesson-planning!

 

Raymond

One thought on “India x Raymond part 2; Time to Teach

  • May 25, 2017 at 3:38 pm
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    The language barrier can be a really big challenge! From my experience teaching English in Taiwan, you can take advantage of the fact that they’re kids and they probably don’t know a lot of advanced Hindi either. As time goes by, I’m sure you’ll learn (or at least are able to navigate through) some Hindi and they will also be able to navigate through some English. Good luck Raymond, you’re doing great!

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