First Day in the Lab I #1

I chose to intern at the Castro-Lowenstein Lab on the University of Michigan’s Medical Campus because of its research on brain cancer, specifically pediatric glioblastoma, and its research role in the Department of Neurosurgery.

The first day of my internship began with meeting my fellow co-workers. From there, my mentor went over our research project: studying the role of long non-coding RNA in mutating histone 3.3 glycine position 34 in causing human grade glioma. Since my mentor has not yet produced a plasmid that induces the desired mutation after several months of experimentation, I expect that much of the work that I will undertake over of the summer will deal with ligating two plasmid sequences to create the desired plasmid. Additionally, an operation that I aided with was performing a perfusion on a mouse to obtain its brain for further research. This is an intricate procedure that may provide information on the growth of a mouse brain tumor that mimics a human tumor.

This lab will provide a great opportunity to apply the information I have learned in class towards better understanding my biochemistry major. Additionally, one difficulty that will arise is understanding the new terminology and techniques that I have never encountered before. This will provide a new learning opportunity while providing a challenge.

 

3 thoughts on “First Day in the Lab I #1

  • May 13, 2018 at 11:09 am
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    Tell Maria hello from Margaret and Eloisa

    Reply
  • May 13, 2018 at 11:10 am
    Permalink

    Tell Maria hello from Margaret and Eloisa

    Reply
  • May 18, 2018 at 2:54 pm
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    Thank you for sharing your experience on the first day, Matthew!

    I’m Samantha Hegeman, and I work in the Opportunity Hub. I will be following your blog posts this summer, and I look forward to hearing about your internship at the Castro-Lowenstein Lab.

    It sounds like you have an incredible opportunity to make an impact within Michigan Medicine research (especially if you’re able to create the desired plasmid!). Applying your classroom knowledge to the field is a great goal to set for yourself, and I understand the challenge of learning new terminology and techniques. I’m curious to know how you anticipate overcoming those challenges and how your mentor will support you.

    I look forward to your next update!

    Reply

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