Not just lab mates | #6

As I prepare to return to my lab once the fall semester begins, I find myself becoming excited to see everyone in my lab again. I remember first meeting them and thinking, “How will I ever remember all their names” (even though our lab is fairly small). Now, after the countless hours I’ve spent with them, not even just talking or socializing all the time but just working on our own projects, they’ve become unforgettable parts of my college experience.

The atmosphere is so friendly and open all the time, and we have no problem shifting from academic talk to conversations about anything and everything. We’ll attend research presentations and product shows, and then movie marathon and go out to eat ice cream the same day. Even after seeing their faces almost every day for two months, I still didn’t get sick of lab. It’s become my home away from home, where I can sit down to eat lunch, check on my cells, get some homework done, chat with my PI, and then go back to classes. I’m so grateful that I randomly picked this lab to join, because my lab mates are not just lab mates… they’re family.

Jenn

I'm a rising junior studying Cellular & Molecular Biology. This summer, I'm working in an MCDB lab to gain more research experience!

One thought on “Not just lab mates | #6

  • August 29, 2018 at 2:07 pm
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    Jenn,

    Thanks for sharing this last blog post – lots of warm and fuzzy feelings here!

    Work can be a frustrating thing to approach at times, but often, the saving grace in an otherwise unsatisfactory experience can be the people that you meet and collaborate with. Regardless of how any experience turns out, if you’ve made some meaningful and genuine connections, those relationships will become the value that you glean and the thing you remember most about any particular job.

    I’m so glad that you’ve been able to make these connections – there can be a fine line between colleague and friend, and it can become difficult when those lines are blurred in contentious situations. If and when those types of situations arise, how do you think you’ll approach those conflicts so that the work gets done but the relationship isn’t damaged? Food for thought!

    -Josh

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